The Fastest Way to Get Stronger (WORKS EVERY TIME!)


What’s up, guys? Jeff Cavaliere, ATHLEANX.com. Today I’m going to talk to you about how
to make you about how to make you stronger in the fastest way possible. I’m going to tell you this right off the
bat. This is going to be a very simple video. Not necessarily easy because the hard work
that has to come from implementing what I’m going to tell you here is never going to be
easy. But it’s simple by the fact that this is
not complicated. We all know that there are two things that
will produce the most amount of strength the fastest. That is choosing compound exercises as the
basis of what you do. Number two: progressively overloading them. The beauty behind progressive overload and
compound exercises is that they go hand in hand. Because of the multiple muscles participating
in these compound movements we have a great capacity to add significant weight to that
bar to allow us to do this. Now, we run into some problems down the road
when we start to reach plateaus, but for beginners, my God, it’s one of the best ways for us to
reach those new heights, in terms of what we can produce, strength-wise. However, I’ve also pointed out here before
that when we take this approach we have to be very, very sure that we’re working on
filling the gaps and not leaving cracks in the foundation along the way. It’s not enough to simply perform the exercises
we know are supposed to be the big ones, the big, compound lifts, and bastardizing them
along the way in the pursuit of numbers alone. Pursuing numbers alone will almost always
leave cracks behind in the foundation of those exercises that you’ll have a hard time repairing
as you build on that. You build, what I call, compensatory strength
on top of a weak foundation. What we want to do is build true strength
along the way. So, what are the compound exercises? Again, it’s simple, guys. We’re not breaking ground here with what
we’re saying. We know if we’re going to do something,
let’s say pressing, we’ve got to press. What I like to do is press vertically and
press horizontally. So, we’re going to do an overhead press – not
behind the neck, guys. I’ve covered that before, why that’s biomechanically
not the best place to press from anyway. We want to press from in front of our body
and we want to do a bench-press. Typically, I prefer a slight incline. About a 30-degree incline on an incline bench,
as opposed to a flat out bench-press. That covers our pressing. Pulling. We want to row, and we want to make sure we’re
doing some sort of vertical pull. For me, that would be a weighted chin-up. We could go with a weighted pullup. I like that, too. But by getting our elbows out in front of
our body, again, safer for our shoulders and number two, we recruit the lats in a better
way because we put them on stretch once we get our elbows in front of our body. So, there’s our pulling. So far, pretty simple. Then we have our lower body. It couldn’t get anymore simple here, guys. Squats and deadlifts. Anterior chain, posterior chain. At least much more dominantly posterior chain
for the deadlifts. The fact is, these exercises are great because
they allow us to perform in a way that’s athletic. We know that athletic movements are going
to require multiple muscles to work together, not in isolation. So, I like them, and they are a foundation
for building athleticism. However, we’re going to get back to that
in a second. When you do them, when we program these foundational
movements into all our training programs – all of them – because we realize how important
they are. When you do them let’s just say – and
I’ve used this example before – in a bench-press you’ve got your triceps, you’ve got your
shoulders, you’ve got your chest all contributing to that lift. Why are they so effective as strength generators? Why? Because we can load them. We can load them significantly because you
take a muscle like the triceps, the shoulders of the chest, each having their own strength
capacity, and you pair them up synergistically. These are agonists working together in a synergy
for a common goal. To press that bar off your chest. In every circumstance the combination of muscles
that work together is going to be higher, with a better strength capacity than that
which could be performed by any one of them individually. We know that. That’s why isolation exercises aren’t
necessarily the best way to attack your strength. However, we do know, as I’ve pointed out
before, that at some point down the road you might want to start individually trying to
address these component parts, knowing that as each one of them gets stronger the overall
impact of the whole is going to improve. We realize that. But for beginners, most of all, those just
looking to get strong, fast, they would focus on the one exercise they can do that will
incorporate the three. That’s what we want to do. However, here’s what I talked about that
we wanted to make sure we addressed; what could happen here. And what could happen here, if you’re singularly
focused on strength, you’re going to leave holes behind. I guarantee you’re going to leave holes
behind. It could be in the form of imbalances. It could be in the form of muscle weaknesses. It could be in the form of neglecting other
elements of athleticism. Guys, we know that just because you’re strong
does not mean you’re a good athlete. There are a lot of ‘oafie’ people walking
around, big meatheads that are strong as shit that couldn’t do one, simple athletic endeavor. Not one. Couldn’t run a 300-yard shuttle in less
than 45 seconds. Couldn’t’ do a box jump on anything over
40”. That’s pretty bad. You need to have some of that athleticism
on top of your strength if you’re trying to be, overall, much more impressive than
just singularly focused on one element. But I mentioned the susceptibility to injury. Why? I talked about it in recent videos. If you move in one plane all the time that’s
ultimately – while building a critical component of athleticism, which is strength – it’s
also leaving many vulnerabilities behind because we don’t move in one dimension. Always training in the sagittal plane. The deadlift. The squat. The bench-press. Always training in the sagittal plane here
is leaving you very vulnerable to the other planes. We know we need to be able to move and thrive
in all three planes. So, we need to train there. That’s why, when I look at a complete training
program, it’s not always about strength. ATHLEANX is not the place to come if you want
to become the next Thor Bjornson. And I love Thor Bjornson. Literally, the World’s Strongest Man. But he’s also – this is his craft. This is his area of expertise. He applies a level of science to it and a
level of respect to the process that it deserves. Not just some guy who likes to bench 350lbs. That’s who you’re going to go to for all
your advice. Or claims to have a 500lb squat, and that’s
who you’re going to go to for all your advice. Guys, that’s not how you should be selecting
your criteria for who you should listen to. Listen to a person who’s exceled in that
area. The area that I believe I excel in, is creating
the well-rounded, all around athlete. I know that athleticism is about more than
just strength. You build your foundation on that. All of our programs build a foundation around
strength movements. Around the core compound exercises because
of the value they provide, as I just told you. But you know at some point you need to start
exploring that frontal plane. You need to explore the transverse plane. You need to explore corrective exercises. I know they’re boring. I know they’re the little, sissy things
you see people doing. Rotator cuff and face pulls. Guys, there’s a reason why it’s so important
because we’re filling in the gaps that the big exercises don’t provide. We also know – I’ve actually seen this
first hand. Carlos Beltran, one of the best athletes I’ve
ever worked with. One of the strongest athletes I’ve ever
worked with. We go into any lower body-based movement and
his strength was phenomenal. We try to check his internal rotation strength,
or external rotation strength of his hips and they were incredibly weak. How is that possible? Because we didn’t train it…or he wasn’t
training it. Until we started training it. And when we did, he became an even better
athlete and he had longevity. People thought he was going to hang it up. He stayed around for nine more years and excelled. That’s the point. If you want to be a complete athlete – and
I’m not even talking about if you want to compete athletically. I’m saying, you want to function as a complete
athlete; you’ve got to focus on your mobility. You have to focus on your flexibility. You have to focus on your ability to move
in space. Your agility. You have to focus on your ability to accelerate
and decelerate. You have to focus on your ability to generate
power. You have to focus on your strength. But it’s a component. It’s not the only thing. So, I hope you see the value of this. Again, if you’re a beginner and you just
want to look like you lift, great. Strength only is a great way to go. But realize there will come a point where
you’re likely going to have to start introducing some of these elements. I hope it’s not because you’ve painted
yourself into a corner because of your obsession with strength. God forbid, you’ve painted yourself into
a corner because it was an obsession on numbers alone and you left all those cracks in the
foundation. It’s a great foundation. It’s what you should build yourself on,
but you’ve got to make sure you’re not leaving on a shaky foundation. So, I lead you down that road with caution. However, I will tell you this, again, we can
simplify the process. It’s never been a complex process, but it’s
one I think we need to have a little more respect for. Don’t settle for being one-dimensional. Realize the potential of adding strength to
the entire picture and realize how much you can excel then. That’s what we’ve achiever, or what we’re
trying to achieve. So, guys, I hope this clarifies any questions
you might have. We have a perfect workout series that we came
up with that tries to take this approach. Even an example of a chest workout. We know that pressing through a pushup, through
a dip, through a bench-press while taking an exercise through its full range of motion
is not taking the chest through its full capacity the range of motion through the shoulder joint
of what it’s capable of. None of them adduct the arm across the chest. That’s a hole. That’s a hole that’s going to come back
and wind up biting you later on down the road because you’re not strengthening the chest
through its full range of motion, via the joint it’s attached to in crossing. So, we need to do that. We’ve tried to work those into those exact
workouts. Just to give you more of an idea when you’re
trying to fill the gaps, what it would look like. Guys, if you haven’t seen those videos make
sure you check them out. They’re on our YouTube channel here. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe
and turn on your notifications so you never miss those. If you’re looking for complete programs
that take these foundational exercises as the foundation of what we do and build off
it to make sure we leave no holes behind, those are all our programs available at ATHLEANX.com. In the meantime, if you’ve found this video
helpful leave your comments and thumbs up below. Let me know what else you want me to cover
and I’ll do my best to do that for you in the days and weeks ahead. See you soon.

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100 thoughts on “The Fastest Way to Get Stronger (WORKS EVERY TIME!)

  1. NOTIFICATION SQUAD GIVEAWAY – Alright guys, I’m giving away a complete 30 Day Workout program to 100 lucky clickers within the first hour this video is published! Remember, this is NOT THE FIRST 100, but those randomly selected within the first hour the video is published. Click the link to see if you’ve won. No strings attached! 
    https://giveaway.athleanx.com/ytg/how-to-get-strong

    If you don’t win, no worries. Just be sure you have your notifications turned on so you can get to my next video quickly and try again. Good luck and thanks for being a loyal subscriber…

  2. Bench, row, squat, deadlift; face pull, triceps

    OHP, w chinup, squat, hip thrust; face pull, side raises

  3. "And kind of BASTARDIZING them along the way in pursuit of the numbers"
    Even his cursing is used properly. Perfect

  4. I think the strength thing is somewhat overrated. I have seen plenty skinny small powerlifter guys who move a ton but have damn small arms. I believe it is just about working the intended muscle.

  5. I cannot believe or accept how much time I wasted not doing these over the years no back pain now knees better.

  6. 5:47
    That's all you needed to say
    I believe 90% of people are far more concerned about size and strength than becoming athletes.
    I doubt actual paid athletes even come to YouTube for advice, that's not your audience.

  7. i think we should combine Olympic weight lifting exercises with Strength exercises, like Push press, Snatch pull, power clean, push jerk, overhead squat, Clean pull etc. They require speed and Mobility as well as strength. What do you say?

  8. Nutrition is the main ingredient for strength besides exercise and good sleep if you want to know the inexpensive and possible way to take 20 servings of fruits and vegetables daily check out ericvargas.juiceplus.com and take a big step towards good health benefits that you will be pleased with. Checkout the site and discover /research this product and see for your self if you decide to move forward

  9. 10 min yoga for warm-up
    5×5 Weight Training SL
    20 min HITT Rowing Machine

    Best athletic workout I've ever experienced. Balance

  10. I genuinely thought that chin ups were pull ups for wimps. Pretty amazed at the amount of knowledge in each of his videos.

  11. Many people say that doing the same workout two or more days in a row makes the muscle shrink means we can't train the same muscle the second day.Can you please explain that.While triceps are involved in almost all workouts.

  12. Glenn ross, former UK and Europes strongest man, weighed 1/4 tonne and deadlifted 3 Citroen saxos! My god was he fat and unhealthy! Strong as fuck though

  13. Hey Jeff, what do you think about replacing rows with power clean? I'm thinking you'd get benefits of the rows and some increased activation for calves that would otherwise be neglected?

  14. Great video to me as I was going to start arnies blueprint but found compound exercises make a lot more sense to start out thank you for the vid….

  15. How would you do these exercises in a weekly routine though? If you’re doing leg day and wanna do squats and deadlifts, but deadlifts require your back and arms as well but what if they’re resting from your workout 2 days ago

  16. “They couldnt run a 300 yard shuttle in less than 45 seconds or box jump on anything over 40 inches.”

    I feel personally attacked right now

  17. I trained like this with great results quickly, but left out the small things and got injured and lost all my gains. Fuck my life

  18. Listening to your definition of athleticism with a box jump or a 300m shuttle is ridiculous. There are limits due to several issues that keep people from vertical jump and foot speed. Injuries, age are some factors to be considered.

  19. I hate the way people see meat heads as some powerful brutes n see me as just some skinny guy when in fact I can hop over fences like nothing out run a dog and out box a meat head

  20. Tu/Fri : 8 sets of squats w/varying rep ranges. Then 10-15 min of hill sprints.

    Wed/Sun : Upper body pushing and pulling. **I also do 2-3 sets of deadlifts on Sun.

    This basic routine with progressive overload has served me well. I hate bro splits and bodybuilding BS.

  21. And unless you are competing in powerlifting, you can do trap bar deadlifts, instead of squats and deadlifts, especially if you are just a beginner. Trap Bar deads (which are a hybrid of squats and deadlifts), with OHP and chins, is just about it.

  22. Totally right about strength and athleticism. It doesnt HAVE to be this way, but very often power lifters and guys who just lift, have zero athleticism outside of one dimension–strength. Similarly, there's really fit, athletic guys who have zero strength. Oly lifters seem to have both, probably because any type of cleans (power, squat/cleans etc), build athleticism–when you are pulling off the ground and putting over your head in an explosive manner.

  23. Jeff’s so thorough, he alternates what side of the bed he sleeps on with his wife each night 😆
    Mon : left
    Tue : right
    Wed : left
    Thur : right
    Fri : left
    Sat : right
    Sun : ……..kicked out on the couch!

  24. Chin ups/pull ups, pushups, of various forms, over head dumbbell presses, and some one legged squats. That is all you need. You might throw in some cardio. Personally, I never took the dead lift seriously as an exercise. It seems a little like the muscle up: A demonstration of strength and not a real exercise. Just my humble opinion. But I love this channel. A lot of very great advice!

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